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Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
that the united states president barack obama will be in the country, possibly at that memorial service. you know, he moves in a vast cordon of security, and that complicates things tremendously. we have to prepare for what's expected to be very large crowds when nelson mandela's body will be flying state. and there is so much preparation to be done ahead that have. we're not sure we have ever seen an event of this magnitude in south africa, up to and including the recent world cup, and we are still concerned somewhat in our ability to manage this in a way that would be fitting to the memory of the man. >> our correspondent for the "mail" and "guard unanimous" newspaper. thanks very much. moving on to other news now -- hundreds of french soldiers have set up quarters in the central african republic capital. they are part of a u.n. mission to restore law and order in a country torn apart by interreligious violence. almost half a million people have fled their home in fear. people are finding refuge wherever they can. >> thousands of christians have sought refuge just outside the capital. they say
in the country. when president obama was here a few short months ago, he talked about the ways it has the potential to be an after our strengths are linked to one another. i think that's the best way to memorialize all that he meant to us. >> we know december 15th is when will be the final good-bye, if that's appropriate to say, we'll see each other again, but the final good-bye here. i can't imagine there won't be a television set or radio on where people will gather and watch this moment that will be unmatched as far as the diversity and the range of people who sincerely say that this man changed their life, set the compass of their direction in life. >> that's so true, tamron. during the anti-apartheid moment, we used to chant all the time, the whole world is watching, here again he has made certain that the world world is watching, everyone is pausing and reflecting on what this man meant to us all. we count ourselves blessed to have lived in the shadow of his grace all of these years and it's just going to be one of those moments spoken of for years. where people ask where you we
of their countries. but president obama would bristle at comparisons. >> reporter: it was interesting. on that africa trip, president obama compared mandela to somebody else, to george washington, as the founder of south africa. and also in the sense that mandela stepped down from power voluntarily, just as george washington stepped down after two terms. mandela stepped down after only one. >> an important example to set. jon karl, thanks very much. >>> let's go to josh and the other top stories. >> we're going to begin with the other big story here in the u.s. major ice storm. and one of the worst in years. people from texas to kentucky are being hit the hardest as several states have, in fact, declared states of emergencies. millions could be left without power. elsewhere, so cold, in fact, in the rockies and in the upper plains, some locations are seeing temperatures of 25 below zero. ginger's forecast coming in just a moment. >>> and some big news about the economy today. the labor department reports that some 203,000 jobs were created last month. that number surpasses expectations. the unemploym
restaurants around the country. it came on the heels of president obama's new push to put economic inequality in the center of our politics. and this week, surprisingly good news on the economy. and congress. abc news jeff zeleny reports. >> reporter: the feeling of economic unease. >> we're on public assistance. we don't want to be. >> reporter: growing across the country. >> keep your burgers keep your fries. >> all: make our wages supersize. >> reporter: president obama capitalizing on the sentiment. and changing the subject from health care. >> we know that people's frustrations run deeper than the most recent political battles. >> reporter: saying income inequality is one of the nation's greatest threats. >> it's rooted in the nagging sense that no matter how hard they work, the deck is stacked against them. >> reporter: as the economy rebounds -- >> last month, 203,000 new jobs were created. >> reporter: -- fears still run deep. more than 6 in 10 workers fear for losing their jobs. an have been left out of the rekoifrry. ricky grimes is a trash collector in rural virginia. >> i'm still
he stood for and what he wanted out of this is own country and the world. >> here with us tonight on the passing of nelson mandela. president obama will deliver a statement on the passing of the former south african president coming up here in about 4 1/2 minutes as soon as the president comes out. we will bring you his remarks live. president obama to speak from the white house in just a few moments. let's bring in nbc's andrea mitchell. such a full life led by nelson mandela. if you could speak about the escalating international pressure to release him back in 1990, what was that like? this must have been a real global effort. >> it was indeed. it began before that. during the reagan years, initially president reagan is very much against apartheid and he was led to the position finally of opposing apartheid by george schultz. a rising star and a strong presence on foreign policy than a senator from indiana. there was a global push for this from faith leaders and from anti-segregationists here in this country. we heard just now the secretary general of the united nations that no
africa. leaders from at least a dozen countries will be here, united states president obama, as well as two former presidents, presidents clinton and bush as well as their wives will be in attendance with many other american dignitaries. they will be joined by the leaders of at least a dozen other countries, and more are continuing to join. >> madiba, this guy was the greatest, we'll never see someone like him again. >> reporter: on sunday, thousands packed places of worship in pretoria and soweto, different creeds and colors honoring a special man. >> today was a special mass for madiba. he said peace and we must hold that peace so that where is he, he'll be very pleased. >> reporter: tears and cheers capturing the loss and love for tata or father, as south africans called mandela. the makeshift memorials outside mandela's johannesburg home continue to grow but the greatest memorial may be the faces, black and white together. parents bring children who will live a life madiba helped make possible. >> they were born free, they were born in the free south africa so they'll experience
of us could lead a country out of an era of apartheid and lead with humility. president obama, i remember the last time he came here, he came here to thank people for their support in the solidarity movement. he just came to say thank you. what a sense of humility and an awesome spirit this man had. and his spirit is going to live forever. >> i want to talk about the particularities of this man's life and some of the different chapters of it. most specifically next, i want to talk about the nature of the apartheid regime, which is so removed from us, we know it was a racist regime. but it was a truly evil and outlaw regime. and what his life in prison and in hiding looked like and how the end of that regime was brought about. so stick around. we're going to talk about that. if you're seeing spots before your eyes... it's time... for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a m
:10. celebrating the life of nelson mandela. president obama reacts to the death of the leader. >> and arctic air is keeping temperatures in the country low. coming up, the snow and ice wreaking havoc on the roads. >> freezing temperatures again today but clouds moving in closer maybe some rain and snow too. we'll talk about that coming up. >> and we just got an update from pg&e. a third power outage now in beech leaves more than 4,000 customers in the dark in benicia. we'll have the latest on the streets impacted plus the rest of your morning drive all coming up. ,,,,,,,, [uncle]this is hopscotch,okay? uncle go one,two,one,two,one two,one. [niece]okay! [uncle]okay? [niece]one,two three,four,five,six,seven,eight! [uncle laughing] okay,we go the other way,okay? [niece]one,two,three,four,five, six,seven! [uncle laughs]there's ten spaces,you want to try again? [uncle]yeah? history in his hands and be the arc of the moral univer towards justice. may god bls his memory and keep him in peace." president obama will attend state funeral for nelson maa in >>> for now, let us pause and give thanks for the
of the bbc, i spent a lot of time covering civil wars in africa. i do think, as president obama said, that mandela's personal force of character did make a very significant difference in preventing that country going to civil war. i think one of the things that people forget now about it, which was just so extraordinary at the time was the immense pressure the man was under. i mean he had pressure from the international community to get this right. he also had pressure from his own party because there were many in the a.n.c. who were real hot heads who just wanted an armed struggle, who didn't want to negotiate with the whites. he had pressure from other parties. you remember the zulu leader. he was achieving at the bit. then there were the whites emselves, which were split down the middle between the moderates of declercq and ralph mayer, and the extremists of the a.w.b. he was juggling all these factions, and the fact that he managed to navigate his way through to an incredible outcome of an election, a very peaceful election, and then the transition to black majority rule without
parks to churches as people gather to remember the father of their country. we will also tell you the specific plans now that we know about president obama's visit along with some other u.s. presidents here to south africa later this week as we report from soweto. >> lester, looking forward to that. we will get back to you shortly. >>> we want to get to today's top story in the u.s., another round of both powerful winter storms creating treacherous conditions at this point from california all the way to new england. the weather channel's mike seidel is in a very chilly leesburg, virginia, this morning. good morning. >> reporter: good morning. as we await the first wintery weather west of washington, dallas is encased in ice. the west coast got slammed by a second storm on saturday. in barts of north dakota and montana, temperatures have stayed below zero since thursday. no break in the wintery blast as a new storm moved into california. heavy snow in the mountains made the roads unsafe. >> it's slippery and dangerous. you try to change lanes and you're going sideways. >> reporter:
this weekend. >> it is a week full of events. tuesday is memorial service which president obama and other heads of state will attend. there are going to be public viewing areas throughout the country, as well. >> wednesday through friday, nelson mandela will lie in state at the seat of government, which is, of course, pretoria and on sunday the state funeral will be held at his ancestral home which is qunu in south africa's eastern cape region. >> moments ago, we heard from desmond tutu speaking about nelson mandela, how he prevented an all-out racial war after leaving prison. >> everybody was saying we would have gone up in flames. and -- and he was like, here he was like a magician. he really was like a magician with a magic wand. turning us into this glorious multicolored rainbow people. >> speak of iconic figures, desmond tutu. >> he spoke at my college. and led the divestment movement. you have the shanty 2001s, the tents in the yard and everything as people were basically protesting investment in south africa. he spoke to us. >> he's quite the character, that's for sure. one of the people
nothing would stop you from electing the government of your choice. country's infrastructure. he met the white house, meeting with three sitting presidents. in 2002 george w. bush presented him with the medal of freedom. president obama met mandela once in 2005, when obama was a senator. after one term as president mandela stepped down. he did not slow his pace. his charitable foundation raised money for a variety of causes. when south africa hosted soccer's world cup tournament in july 2010 he made his last major public appearance at the final game. the crowd honoured him with a thunderous ovation. his third wife, grassa michelle, the former first lady of mozambique was at his side during his battles with prostate cancer and lung infections that hospitalized him in the end. >> never, and never again, that this beautiful land will again experience the oppression of one by another, and suffer the indignity of being the scum of the world. the sun shall never set on so glorious a human achievement. god bless africa. thank you. nelson mandela dead at 95. >> let's get to the white house,
of the man? what did he mean to his country? >> el with, he -- well he means. i think the challenge is to live up to the example as he set, as president obama indicated. what was great about mandela was his respect for the rule of law. think about it for just a moment. 27 years in jail on an ill legitimate situation, his advisor said no no no you can't do it, you can't appear on this case of rugby and discrimination, a libel set of some sort, it was that stubborn sense of fairness which kept the process on track. and we americans owe him and the country of south africa a great debt. because nothing would have torn this country apart in the 1970s or perhaps in the '80s but a race war in south africa. so all i want to do is celebrate this wonderful, wonderful man. >> i actually want to pick up ou had been appointed by an african american president, you had seen the current day legacy of nelson mandela in south africa. how did it resonate? >> it resonated incredibly --hie country. you know from people on the street to people in government. everyone aspires to live up to the legacy he l
for creating a pathway to freedom for all of us, a message that is being heard here and in other countries as well. michaela? >> very moving indeed. erin mclaughlin, thank you for that. >> the tributes are pouring in from all over the world this morning. president obama had some very, very poignant words to honor the late president of south africa. he actually invoked words that were used at president lincoln's funeral. >> he no longer belongs to us. he belongs to the ages. through his fierce dignity and bending will to sacrifice his own freedom for the freedom of others, madiba transformed south africa and moved all of us. his journey from a prisoner to a president embodied the presence that human beings and countries can change for the better. his commitment to transfer pour and reconcile for those who jailed him set an example that all humanity took inspire to whether the lives of nations or our own personal lives. the fact did he it all with grace, with humor, and the ability to acknowledge his own imperfections only makes the man that much more remarkable. >> well said. the president
to the apartheid regime was divided in this country and many other nations. you look at say the early origins of investment campaign where a young barack obama as a student was involved, many other young idealists and international humanitarians but it was not seen at the time as a way to actually break the regime. it was seen as first a symbolic step and then got traction. the international program against the apartheid regime was a huge factor. walk us through that. >> that's right. it took a long time to gain motion. it seemed idealistic at the beginning, like many younger obama, i remember taking part myself in the protest on college campuses. and but it gained speed, just because so many people caught onto it. in a sense it was the last really coherent global social protest movement. and of course, it was all rallying around mandela. i can remember very well from those days, free mandela was the great rallying cry as sit-ins and protests were formed on these campuses. so it really in the end had the impact that it was intended to have, not something you can see about most protests. >> in
to vote for him as president. he was as jacob zuma put it today, the country's greatest son. >> this is the moment of our deepest sorrow. our nation has lost its greatest son. >> shortly after the news of nelson mandela's death reached the white house president obama said this. >> i am one of the countless millions to drew inspiration from nelson mandela's life. my very first political action, first thing i ever did that involved an issue or a policy or politics was a protest against apartheid. i would study his words and his writings. the day he was released from prison gave me a sense of what human beings can do when they're guided by their hopes and not by their fears. we will not likely see the likes of nelson mandela again. so it falls to us as best we can to follow the example that he set, to make decision guided not by hate but by love, to never discounsels the difference that one person can make to strife for a future that is worthy of his sacrifice. for now, let us pause and give thanks for the fact that nelson mandela lived, a man who took history in his hands. and
for three days to allow for public viewing. now we know that president barack obama will lead a u.s. presidential delegation to this country. but it's not clear yet which event he will be attending. but by far the biggest public event will be that national memorial service at a soccer stadium in soweto and ultimately nelson mandela's body will be flown to his ancestral village in qunu for a private burial on the 15th of december. >> thank you. >>> joining us from johannesburg is john carlin the south africa correspondent of the london independent newspaper when mandala was freed from prison in 1990, he's the author two of books about mandala's life and times, including the one on which the film "invictus" was based. good morning to you, john. >> good morning. >> i had a chance to read your article yesterday in the uk it was beautiful. you talk a lot about the last time you saw nelson mandela four years ago. what was he like then? >> yeah. well it was almost exactly four years ago actually on the 8th of december, 2009. just before the movie "invictus" was abou
, themselves, say that those words are not sufficient enough to describe what he has done for this country, wolf. >> i against the whole country is getting ready for a lot of world leaders including president obama to come to south africa to pay their respects. what are you seeing and feeling there in anticipation of all of these world leaders coming there? >> well, there most certainly is the sense of appreciation and pride that a south african leader like nelson mandela put this country into the spotlight, and that his passing away is causing this attention, these global leaders to come into the country itself. there's also a sense amongst people that perhaps this celebration, this aura of celebration is going to morph into a much more somber atmosphere, especially as we get closer and during the days when he is actually being buried, the day when of course that memorial for him is going to be taking place. this has really been a moment for so many that we've been speaking to, to really feel that sense of pride in the country that's prided their country gave birth to an individual to suc
to defend their own country. >>> former presidents george w. bush and clinton will join president obama at a memorial for nelson mandela next week as south africa mourns its former president, hundreds of people of all ages and colors are leaving candles, flowers, stuffed animals, balloons at the home of the civil rights icon. nelson mandela died thursday. he was 95 years old. mandela's legacy is definitely a complicated one. while in prison he was labeled a terrorist by the reagan administration. mandela even had to get a special waiver to visit the u.s. in the 1990s. he wasn't removed from that terrorist list until 2008. cnn editorial producer nadia bill check with us. this is a part of history that very few people know as well as they know the history of his days in prison and then what happened afterwards. why was he labeled a terrorist? >> let's go back to 1961. nelson mandela together with his comrade, a military wing. why do they start a military wing? peaceful measures are no longer working against the oppressive apartheid regime. one of the reasons, one of the catalysts was some
to go into the country and to actually determine whether or not iran is serious. so that will be one of the big determinates about iran o's lev of seriousness in terms of going forward with this deal. president obama also pointing to the fact that of $100 billion worth of sanctions, they are easing about $7 billion of those sanctions, leaving in the strong and sort of core parts of the sanctions program. of course, that, not enough to convince skeptics, israelis, a majority of them say this deal is not a good enough deal. prime minister benjamin netanyahu also saying that this deal isn't strong enough, doesn't do enough to curb iran's nuclear program. he is going to speak at the sabon center tomorrow, by the way, craig. we'll likely get a very different take on this deal that's come together from him. but i think that president obama's goal today was to speak to israelis and certainly to some of the skeptics here within the united states. a lot of them in congress who have said the deal doesn't go far enough. >> nbc's kristen welker at the white house, we're going to come back to you
, abc news, johannesburg. >> alex, thank you. >>> president obama called himself one of the countless millions who drew inspiration from nelson mandela. he ordered flags at the white house and across the country to be lowered to half staff. karen travers has reaction from around the world. ♪ >> reporter: outside of the home where nelson mandela died, they sang in memory and mourning. >> great fighter, strong man. >> reporter: south africa's president delivered the long dreaded news. >> our nation has lost its greatest son. our people have lost their father. >> reporter: president obama praised the man he called a personal inspiration. >> we've lost one of the most influential, courageous and profoundly good human beings that any of us will share time with on this earth. >> reporter: that sense of historical loss ranged from royalty. >> extremely sad and tragic news. we are reminded what an extraordinary and inspiring man nelson mandela was. >> reporter: to regular people. >> is there a man who has more people aware of what he has contributed? >> reporter:. >> reporter: as a young ma
settlement. even as world powers prepare to sit down with iran the obama administration is opening the door to sell weapon defense systems to u.s. allies in the region. despite the deal with iran the country opposes threats addressed by the nuclear agreement. our emphasis to diplomatic tools should not be determined. we know we cannot operate in a vacuum. our success will continue to hinge on american's military power and assurance to our allies and partners in the middle east that we will use it. hagel made the comment while addressing leaders in bahrain. >>> six suspect are in police custody accused of stealing radioactive material from a truck on monday. they are being interrogated to see if they played a role in the theft of cobalt 60. they located the truck on wednesday and recovered most of the material. the suspects were treated and releaseandrelease after all butd negative for radioactive poisoning. ♪ >>> an intense winter storm is moving through the mid section of the mit -- mid west. it's coming to an end. it sphreches o -- stretches from texas to the ohio valley texas has been
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)